Rethink Your eNewsletter Strategy

Rethink Your eNewsletter Strategy

A decade ago, the original thought behind this article was to “start” a monthly eNewsletter, rather than typing one, printing it on paper, and sending it home in your students’ backpacks to their parents. That strategy was a main reason why many families never received their monthly newsletter. They were either found crumpled at the […]

How Many Messages Does It Take…

How Many Messages Does It Take…

Remember that commercial – “How many licks does it take to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop?”  The owl counts to three, then bites his way to the center. Even though it’s meant to poke fun at the wise owl, it contains three powerful marketing messages: first, we may have seen […]

The 100 Child March

The 100 Child March

Chances are you’ve heard about the Million Man March.  It was an event held on October 16, 1995, where African-American men were encouraged to gather in Washington DC to promote African-American values and family unity.  But this isn’t a million, it isn’t about men, and it’s not about that kind of march. This article has […]

You’re Asking For It!

You’re Asking For It!

I was going to call this, “If You’re Not Asking For It, You’re Asking For It,” but I thought that would be WAY too confusing – especially if you’ve just started school. You need a little less confusion right now. But remember when you were a kid, and you kept “pushing” your mom by some […]

Everything In Moderation – Part 2

Everything In Moderation – Part 2

I’ve heard from several folks who have responded to the previous Marketing Matters, saying that while they can understand that change is necessary, changing everything will 1) cause too much confusion and 2) it will be really difficult.  If one thing at a time is tried, then the result of that change can be measured […]

Change Means More Change

Change Means More Change

Last week, it was suggested that change must be planned. But change can take three directions (there are always at least three  involved, isn’t there)… Change can go smoothly, as planned. That’s the best we can hope for. But usually, there are two other things that happen, even after careful planning. The first is that […]

Expect Great Things

Expect Great Things

Over the past 10 years, I’ve visited hundreds of schools, and keep hearing the same things, which are reinforced by the daily newscasts: gas prices keep rising, causing food prices to rise, while at the same time we seek alternative energy sources, and the research involved is expensive; five yeas ago the stock market was […]

Everything…In Moderation

Everything…In Moderation

We’ve all heard this wise adage. It’s usually used to encourage us to curtail excessive behavior – limit the consumption of alcoholic beverages, avoid overeating, live a well-balanced life, etc. The emphasis is always on “moderation.” After all, as another wise adage says, “You can’t do everything.” Or, as Clint Eastwood’s “Dirty Harry” once said, […]

X Marks the Spot?  Not Anymore – Y Does!

X Marks the Spot? Not Anymore – Y Does!

To whom are you directing your marketing materials?  An article by David Mastovich, who publishes “Light Reading” as part of his “Massolutions” eNewsletter, stated the following:     

Marketers, historians and writers love to coin catchy phrases to describe generations with similar life experiences, values and attitudes. An entire column could debate the segmentation and descriptions of various generations. Instead, let’s focus on the communication challenges created as a result of four generations working side by side for the first time in American History, including:

• The Silent Generation, born between 1933 – 1945 (ages 73-85)
• Baby Boomers, born between 1946 – 1964 (ages 54-72)
• Gen X, born between 1965 – 1976 (ages 42-53)
• Gen Y, born between 1977 – 1989 (ages 29-41)

The current talk seems to be about the difficulty working with Gen Y.  Since similar angst occurred when Baby Boomers and Gen Xers entered the workforce, we might want to acknowledge that it could be, as Yogi Berra famously said, deja vu all over again. Each generation has similarities and differences.


USA Today, Time Magazine and other media outlets describe Gen Y as nurtured, programmed and pampered by parents more involved than those of previous generations. Academicians note Gen Yers grew up in the era of ‘latchkey kids,’ daycare and high divorce rates. This combination makes Gen Y the most independent generation to date, with a sense of security, optimism and in some ways, entitlement. Their technological expertise, multitasking skills and educational experiences also make Gen Y more prepared to enter the workforce.

You may realize some truth to the description of generations, although debate exists as to where Generation X ends and Generation Y begins.  If you notice the yearly breakdowns, you’ll note that some of the generations indicated above are between 11 and 18 years in length.  Personally, I like to think of a generation spanning 18 to 20 years or so (as is reflected in the above description of the Baby Boomers).  Similarly, we can see attributes of the Generation Y, more commonly referred to now as “The Millennials,” as present in our current ehigh school students – so either Gen Y is has a later “end” date, Gen X is longer than 11 years, or both.  It will still be a few years into the future before we can determine a more clear line of demarcation

However, for argument sake, let’s think about the ages of the children in our K-12 experience today – 5 years old through 18 – which would make them different from any other generation that has gone before them, as are their parents.  Let’s take a closer look. Read more about X Marks the Spot? Not Anymore – Y Does!